The Moon’s Daughter: Abduction

Beautiful, she danced beneath the moon,

among a lemon and almond glade.

Silver flowers were in her hair and she

smiled as she laughed and sang

as she sweetly summoned blossoms

to life – petals bejeweled with dew.

Slender, she sang under the trees, dew-

bright in the dusk, and I saw her moon

fair, shining tresses braided with blossoms

as bright as gems. A daisy on the glade’s

edge, I plucked and brought in song

for her, the rare moon’s daughter, and she,

luminous, smiled at my gift as she

tucked it neatly in her shining hair, a dew-

drop among silver stars. Her greeting she sang

and she offered me a seat upon the grass; moon-

light was her mantel as she glided across the glade,

bringing me fruit to eat. Snow bright blossoms,

radiant, unfurled at her feet, but no blossom

shone brighter than her eyes. For she,

when I had ate my fill, took me to the glade’s

heart, where sparkling rings of dew

became our wedding bands. The moon’s

face changed, until the day my wife sang

enchantingly beneath the wild willows; sang

so brightly, she was snatched like a blossom

by the shadows of infinite night. Moon

cold and empty became my world, and she,

my wife, was lost to me. With cheeks dew-

wet with tears, I wandered in glen and glade.

Forsaken, I came upon a wasteland glade,

and I sat in the red dust and sang

for the winds’ aid. At the break of the dew-

less dawn, I saw the earth, now blossom-

festooned erupt in all hues, and she,

Ayitzan e-Ilisa1 the night wind with moon-

white eyes, came to guide me to distant glades where blossoms shrivel.

Eerie moans sang amid the cloven cliffs, jagged and remote, as she

battled all moon fearing beasts with talons drenched in crimson dew.


1 loosely means “night flower bud of a rose spirit” {from Hebrew layil “night”, nitzan “flower bud”, Akkadian lili meaning spirit, and Yiddish raisa “rose”}

Word Count: 312

Written: 12 October 2010; revised 25 June 2012

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