Toothiana Queen of the Tooth Fairy Armies

The Guardians: Book Three

by William Joyce

“this was the dream she had given him when all seemed lost during one of their first great battles with Pitch!” (Joyce, 55).

Chapter Five – Chapter Eight

In the morning, the entire village of Santoff Claussen boards Bunnymund’s egg-train and journeys to the Lunar Lamadary. There’s another hint at the time frame of the story as “[t]rains were still not invented yet (Bunnymund would secretly help the credited inventors some decades later)” (31). This indicates that the story occurs prior to major, widespread modern industrialization, and additionally that it takes place a couple decades prior it. To me that would be three to four decades, so still probably in the 1700s.

This chapter prominently serves to re-introduce the Lamas, the yetis, and what exactly the Lunar Lamadary is. This is conveyed through Katherine answering the other children’s questions. But near the end, Katherine is suddenly uneasy. She no longer feels quite right with her old friends. Specifically, “[s]he didn’t really know where she wanted to be — with the children or with North and the other grown-ups. Even Kailash didn’t comfort her. She was betwixt and between” (37). It has become about Katherine’s change and growth.

Katherine eventually joins the other Guardians, ruminating on why Nightlight seems distant. She speculates it’s because he misses the battles. She also wonders the same about North, but in contrast to Nightlight the former bandit has changed a lot. And while it isn’t what Katherine notices about North’s change, I loved how he

“still loved conjuring up new toys for the children. (Just that morning he’d brought the youngest William a funny sort of toy–a round biscuit-shaped piece of wood with a string attached to it’s middle. When jerked, it would go up and down almost magically. North call it “yo-yo-ho”) (43-4).

And that’s just adorable! I love it. North created a yo-yo, and I just–I really like Santa Claus, okay?

Additionally, Katherine notes that, unlike Nightlight, North “didn’t seem sad or melancholy or lonely” but instead “[h]is face was alive with excitement” (44). Even with all the danger he’s lived through, he can still invigorated by new projects and ideas and it’s just… Yeah, keep being an awesome inspiration, North!

They arrive at the Himalayas and the Lamadary and it’s beautiful: “the cool , serene, creamy glow of  its moonstone and opal mosaics” (47). It’s short, direct, but visually sumptuous.

Another pretty description is for the horn Yaloo blows; it was “a silver horn forged from ancient meteors” (48). I like it not only for its visual spark, but the underlining story — ancient meteors used to make beautiful objects. There’s a sense of mystery to it that I find appealing.

They contact the Man in the Moon and he, after saying that none of his moonbeams have spotted any signs of Pitch, tells that he believes “the world is on the cusp of a new Golden Age” (52). And I want to know if this is linked to the Enlightenment. I hope not. The Enlightenment was a fine time, but I’ve never been a big fan of it. For reasons. Which I may go into. Sometime.

Either way, with the coming Golden Age, the Man in the Moon tells the Guardians that it will be their responsibility to guide this new age. Upon hearing that North steps forward and – remember that dream Katherine gave him? About a wondrous center of learning and protection? He presents the blueprints of this new city, saying that how it “‘was a gift, one that I now pass on'” (53). And I’m just so emotional and flailing with happiness. Yes, you share that dream, and just, yes~

Using Ombric’s mantra of believe, he conjures up a model of the dream city. It’s incredibly sweet that he acknowledges Katherine’s role in its creation; without her belief in him, seeing the goodness she felt he had, he never would have had this dream in the first place.

North tells the Man in the Moon that he has

“‘a plan for building new centers of magic… One village like Santoff Claussen is not enough, and to expand it would be to change it. What we need instead is are more places where all those kind hearts and inquiring minds–inventors, scientists, artists, visionaries–will be welcomed and encouraged. Where children will always be safe and protected and grow to become their finest selves'” (55).

Yes! Yes! A thousand times yes! Notice how it doesn’t have to just be artists, but it’s not just scientists either. It’s people with imagination, who want to learn, investigate, change things. And place for children to grow and not be hindered — I am a hundred percent okay with this idea. It’s such a beautiful vision. I love it.

After North’s explanation, we get a glimpse of his vision:

“There was a great castlelike structure in its center, surrounded by workshops and cottages. A tiny Nicholas St. North could be seen striding through the village center, with his elves and Petrov, his horse, by his side. And a herd of mighty reindeer. The Yetis too were there” (56).

And it’s a visual of what it will be like but also a visual with traces of Santa Claus’ mythos – workshops, elves, and reindeer. Yeah, I can’t wait for this to become a thing in the story.

 

 

Words:

source

no words

Quote:

Bunnymund: “‘I mean to say, I’ve met them, I’ve talked to them, I’ve read their minds and they’ve read mine, but do I know what they’ll say or do next at any given moment or what underwear they wear on Tuesdays and why? Do I? Do I really know?'” (40).

Works Cited:

Joyce, William. Toothiana Queen of the Tooth Fairy Armies. New York: Atheneum Books, 2012. Print.

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