Toothiana Queen of the Tooth Fairy Armies

The Guardians: Book Three

by William Joyce

“But that was past. This was a different day. And through the friendship he now knew, he could change bad men to good and stone back to flesh” (Joyce, 12).

Chapter One

This book has a beautifully structured plot.

Like E. Aster Bunnymund and the Warrior Eggs at the Earth’s Core! this one begins in Santoff Claussen with the children. They are playing games and it’s actually cute: “In this new game of Warrior Egg tag, to be scrambled meant you had been caught by the opposing egg team and therefore, had a lost a point” (1). There’s a touch of cleverness with the children’s game-naming.

This opening, rather than feeling out of place, works for me. I don’t mind the other children so much. My previous association and attachment to them from Book 1 and Book 2, makes me glad to see them happy. Additionally, the peaceful, happy set-up into story is a relief after the battle at the Earth’s core and North’s near death. I feel good seeing the characters this way.

The chapter proceeds to explain what the children and the Guardians have been doing since their last fight with Pitch. One thing I liked was how

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The Horse and His Boy | Characters

from The Chronicles of Narnia

by C. S. Lewis

“‘I say, Aravis, there are going to be a lot of things to get used to in these Northern countries'” (Lewis, 206).

As I said previously:

I happened to find this on my bookshelf while organizing my piles of writing into binders and read it over the weekend. Of the seven books that make up The Chronicles of Narnia, this has always been my favorite. Which is probably why it’s the only one I have with full color illustrations (and which was the specific edition that I read).

The story takes place during “the Golden Age when Peter was High King in Narnia and his brother and two sisters were King and Queens under him” (3). How this happened and who they are is explained in The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe and their reign (the Golden Age) mentioned.

My main question while reading it was: why did I like it so much, or what made it likable to me? What, if anything, made it stand out against the other Narnian books?

Last time, I discussed how the culture of Calormen is meant to caricature the culture and tone of the 1001 Nights but without Islam, seeing as Calormene worship multiple gods.

In fact when I started reading, I tried to wrap my head around the presentation of the Calormene natives (Bree’s owner and Arsheesh, Shasta’s fisherman father). Both seemed written to be dislikable. And this brought to my mind the idea of characters flaws and how non-white (or non-English coded) characters are portrayed in the story.

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Nicholas St. North and the Battle of the Nightmare King 

The Guardians: Book One

by William Joyce and Laura Geringer

“But it was said that he once defeated an entire regiment of cavalry with a bent steak knife — while he was eating” (Joyce, 61).
Chapter Six — Chapter Nine

Okay, so I think I’ve been trying to explain the plot a bit too much. Not that the plot isn’t important, but that’s never been the point of doing these little…whatever these are (reviews, responses?).

While my discussion of plot points can certainly occur, my goal here is to express what I enjoyed or found problematic. Basically, I really liked reading this and I want to just share how great it is with all of you.

If you understand some of the plot or if it seems as if I’ve missed some connection between what I discuss, I’d recommend reading Nicholas St. North and the Battle of the Nightmare King.

Speaking of North, here’s when he’s finally introduced:

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