The Lord of the Rings • The Fellowship of the Ring | Book One

Nothing elaborate or fancy, just some storytelling thoughts on my re-read:

The plot proper — explicit conflict and character makes a choice that changes their situation — doesn’t begin until “Three Is Company” when Frodo, knowing about the Ring (“The Shadow of the Past”), chooses to travel to Rivendell. This is when the Black Riders first appear. 

On that note, the Black Riders serve as the connecting conflict or anatagonism of this part. They exist as a constant source of fear and anxiety which builds into Frodo’s wounding near Weathertop and eventual onslaught at the Ford of Bruinen.

I found it interesting how much set up there was: Bilbo leaving, Frodo inheriting Bag End, even the time between Frodo officially setting out and his decision to leave with Sam. There’s a seventeen years between “A Long-Expected Party” and “The Shadow of the Past” and that fascinates me. It fits the reader into the doings of Hobbiton and, to a lesser extent the Shire, through their gossip and interactions through the lens of Bilbo and his party. 

Additionally, there’s throughline of the Ring, which Bilbo had and passed to Frodo and which serves as the cause of the plot: Frodo’s leaving the Shire seventeen years later. Even more fascinating, is how the rumors about Bilbo are linked to the Ring — he gained both after he returned from his adventures (There and Back Again, if you will.)

While I can still see how Tom Bombadil is something of a detour, I like what his presence (and later mention) show. Namely, that the hobbits are NOT capable of dealing with malevolent forces which bear no influence of Sauron. If not for Tom, the hobbits would not have escaped the Old Forest or the Barrowdowns. It shows how safe(ly guarded) the Shire is. This is emphasized in Bree; the hobbits seem to attract trouble. 

Additionally, at the very end of this part, Frodo tells the Black Riders to go back to Mordor and leave him alone. But “Frodo had not the power of Bombadil” (209). What strikes me here is the contrast. Tom has the ability to command with his words; Frodo does not, but the parallel to Tom reminds of just that, the ability to use words to dismantle and dispel danger. Even though he’s wounded, Frodo resists in a way that he’s seen used before. It isn’t enough. But I thought it was an interesting detail that wouldn’t have been so striking if Tom had been cut from the story. Heck, even Strider and Glorfindel use words to ease Frodo’s wound. (Well, Strider uses words and athelas, but the point still stands, I think.) 

There was a diversity of poem formats, lots of songs and such. A few have struck with me, but it was enlightening to pay attention to them stylistically.

There were a lot of good quotes. I’d also like to (maybe) type up out when each character is introduced and the first time they speak. Just because I found the order and who and when interesting.

On that note, I’m struck with how direct and precise Tolkien’s language is. I like it. 

More to the point, the way that, while characters have reactions to situations and each other, there’s not a lot of character immersion. I know Sam doesn’t trust Strider because of how Sam talks and what the text tells me: “Sam frowned” (162) and “Sam was not daunted, and he still eyed Strider dubiously” (168). What I mean is, the reader doesn’t experience the story from any particular POV (though the feelings of the hobbits are definitely the viewpoint) and especially not from an immersed-in-said-characters’ experience of the story. That’s not to say the text doesn’t give the reader a sense of what the hobbits feel, because it does. Only it’s not, as I learned on a writing cruise, written in a way for the character to serve as an avatar for the reader in the world. But what’s really fascinating to me about this, is how it reminds me of fairy tales and epics and the Arabian Nights — characters are afraid, delighted, terrified, sorrowful, but it’s conveyed strongest in speech and action. 

On the note of speech, that ties back into Tom Bombadil—words and language are powerful business in Tolkien’s writing. Which, with him being a linguist, makes sense.

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    Cress

    The Lunar Chronicles

    by Marissa Meyer

    I read this back in March 2016 right after finishing Scarlet. I had been waiting to read Cress since I first read Cinder way back when. In Cress there was a lot of progression in the plot, a lot of moments that made me cringe (Scarlet…), and a lot of tense moments (oh my god, Meyer is really good at building tension).

    Unfortunately, a lot of the Rapunzel aspects of the books were a little lackluster to me.

    Spoilers below

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    Scarlet

    The Lunar Chronicles

    by Marissa Meyer

    I started reading this and then stopped because I wasn’t compelled by Wolf as representation of the wolf from “Little Red Riding Hood.” This was mostly because he felt like a cliché: dangerous but still alluring. Plus, his status as part of a group with outdated wolf terminology turned me out of the story. (e.g. alpha, beta, etc.)

    But once Wolf and Scarlet finally started on their way to Paris…the story picked up.

    Spoilers below

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    Cinder

    The Lunar Chronicles

    by Marissa Meyer

    Back when I started reading Marissa Meyer’s Cinder, my initial impression of Book 1 boiled down to: the action is very impelling; so much happens in the first few chapters that I was hard-pressed to put it down.

    Now what does that mean to me as a writer?

    Spoilers below

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    Maiden of the Mist

    Day 26: Feb 26

    Water sprouts, crystallizing into ice so every splash now glistens, a translucent silver petal. These ice flowers fill a field of underground springs. Constant mist glides imperiously across the rumpled earth, born by the heat below the surface and the chill which prances, neverending, in the air. Barely anything lives here, or very few things wish to live here very long. But still, those who wander past or make seasonal homes nearby swear they have seen a figure, like a maiden draped in flowing tattered robes, wandering through the mist. Ghost or guardian, no one can say. But it turns the springs into a haunted place, so less and less humans come.

    [112]

    I have renewed these in lieu of the Refugee Ban in the USA. Inspired by the-cassandra-project and their Every Day Challenge, I am writing every day to raise money for the Urban Justice Center. You can donate here or please spread the word. Thank you.

    The Queen’s Roses

    Day 17: Feb 17

    Roses, roses, rose! There are always roses! She scowls at the dainty flowers, their intoxicating sweet perfume wafting up to her nose. Why not orchids? Or lilies? Or gardenias? They have a strong scent, too! Her scowl deepens, two dark eyes glaring up at the lofty tower high above the gardens. All its windows are shaded, drapes pulled shut to block out any light, whether sunlight or moonlight. There dwells the queen. Stamping her foot, she glares silent threats at the tower. If the queen wishes so much to murder anyone who offends, perhaps the queen should use a different flower to the cover the scent!

    A twist on a “Snow White” fairy tale I wrote recently

    [106]

    I have renewed these in lieu of the Refugee Ban in the USA. Inspired by the-cassandra-project and their Every Day Challenge, I am writing every day to raise money for the Urban Justice Center. You can donate here or please spread the word. Thank you.